Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10532/7076
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dc.contributor.authorGarcía Barreda, Sergies_ES
dc.contributor.authorMarco Montori, Pedroes_ES
dc.contributor.authorBonito, Gregoryes_ES
dc.contributor.authorParladé, Javieres_ES
dc.contributor.authorSánchez Durán, Sergioes_ES
dc.contributor.authorGonzález García, Vicentees_ES
dc.contributor.authorLarena, Inmaculadaes_ES
dc.contributor.authorNiccolò Benucci, Gian Maríaes_ES
dc.coverage.spatialCiencia Vegetales_ES
dc.date.accessioned2024-06-06T09:06:31Z-
dc.date.available2024-06-06T09:06:31Z-
dc.date.issued2023es_ES
dc.identifier.citationFEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 99, Issue 8, 2023es
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10532/7076-
dc.description.abstractTruffle growers devote great efforts to improve black truffle productivity, developing agronomic practices such as ‘truffle nests’ (peat amendments that are supplemented with truffle spore inoculum). It has been hypothesized that improved fruiting associated with nests is linked to stimulation of truffle mycelia previously established in soil or to changes generated in soil fungal community. To assess this, we used real-time PCR to quantify black truffle extraradical mycelium during 2 years after nests installation. We also characterized the fungal community via high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the ITS region of rRNA genes. We found that neither the abundance of truffle mycelium in nests nor in the soil—nest interphase was higher than in the bulk soil, which indicates that nests do not improve mycelial growth. The fungal community in nests showed lower richness and Shannon index and was compositionally different from that of soil, which suggests that nests may act as an open niche for fungal colonization that facilitates truffle fruiting. The ectomycorrhizal fungal community showed lower richness in nests. However, no negative relationships between amount of truffle mycelium and reads of other ectomycorrhizal fungi were found, thus countering the hypothesis that ectomycorrhizal competition plays a role in the nest effect.en
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.relation.urihttps://academic.oup.com/femsec/article/99/8/fiad084/7229544es_ES
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.titleInterannual dynamics of Tuber melanosporum and fungal communities in productive black truffle orchards amended with truffle nestsen
dc.typearticle*
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume99es_ES
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue8es_ES
dc.bibliographicCitation.stpage1es_ES
dc.bibliographicCitation.endpage12es_ES
dc.subject.agrovocTuber melanosporumes
dc.subject.agrovocCultivoes
dc.subject.agrovocSostenibilidades
dc.subject.agrovocEctomicorrizases
dc.description.otherTuber melanosporumen
dc.description.othertruffle nestsen
dc.description.otherextraradical myceliumen
dc.description.otherITS ampliconen
dc.description.othersequencingen
dc.description.otherfungal communityen
dc.description.otherectomycorrhizal fungien
dc.description.statusPublishedes_ES
dc.type.refereedNon-Refereedes_ES
dc.type.specifiedArticlees_ES
dc.bibliographicCitation.titleFems Microbiology Ecologyen
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiad084es_ES
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